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Posted by on Jan 29, 2018 .

A customer who just purchased a ES44AC NS | PRR Heritage loco asked us what would be good to put behind the loco for a prototypical look. Great question, and I wanted to share my response back to him. This is really just a quick response, but you have to start someplace!
 


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Thank you for your purchase tonight with us at US Z Scale. I'd like to take a start at answering your question regarding what to put behind your NS Heritage PRR loco. First, here's a bit of a history of these Heritage units:

Posted by on Jun 20, 2017 .

I think it’s safe to say that in just the past few years Z scale has made great strides in both its performance and appearance, but has our trackwork really kept pace with our trains? With Z scale locos and freight cars now regularly produced with separately applied details, often in fine etched metal, it might be time to look at some alternative track options in Z scale. If realism and smooth operations are what you’re after, I’d suggest giving some serious thought to using Fast Tracks turnout fixtures.

Right out in front let me say that my favorite turnouts in Z scale are built… by me! Fast Tracks turnout building...

Posted by on Jun 20, 2017 .

The AZL Mikado, like all model locomotives, requires a good break-in period to achieve its best running performance. We have a previous article online talking about our recommended break-in method here. However, what do you do if your Mikado seems a little finicky right out of the box the first time? I’ve spoken with AZL directly as well as with many Mikado owners and I’d like to share a few tips with you for getting your Mikado to run its best.

I’d say 95% plus of Mikados run great right out of the box. As with any locomotive however there can be a bit of flash remaining from the manufacturing process or a U-joint can pop...

Posted by on Aug 31, 2013 .

I’m a big believer in methodically breaking-in new locomotives. Since there’s no definitive information from Z scale manufacturers on how to do this, at least that I’m aware of, I’ll explain my break-in method.

I recently wrote an article on this topic over at Raildig.com where I used a simple oval mounted on MDF as my break-in layout. A reader suggested a Figure-8 was a better option and after setting up my new break-in board, I agree.

The Figure-8 gives the new locomotive a complete range of motion and direction combinations: left, right, forward and backward without having to take your locomotive off the track to...

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